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WASHINGTON COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY     (Washington County, Utah)


IVINS, UTAH

Named after Mormon Apostle Anthony W. Ivins who was an early settler of the area and who did a lot of work with the local Indians.


LOCATION

TBD


HISTORY

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints subscribed for a considerable amount of land and water stock, when the project of building a canal on the Santa Clara bench was started. The Church paid in cash, which was so very important in purchasing the needed materials such as cement, flume materials, and other expenses. Apostle Anthony W. Ivins was the investigating authority sent down from Salt Lake City by the General Authorities, and his report was very favorable to the Church Officials. After the town was settled and the Chapel built, it was dedicated in November 1926 by President Anthony W. Ivins. At that time he was second counselor to President Heber J. Grant. A meeting was held with President Ivins being the principal speaker.

It was decided that this town should have a name other than Santa Clara bench. Several names were submitted by the new settlers, however, the name chosen was sent in by Edward H. Snow, President of the St. George Stake. He suggested the new settlement be named after President Anthony W. Ivins, who had endeared himself to the people in this part of the country through his missionary work with the Indians. A short time after this, President Ivins met with the people and when they asked him if he objected to the town being named Ivins, he said, "No, as long as they spell it Ivins, instead of Ivens." At that time he contributed one hundred dollars in cash toward a new chapel and promised to send them a bell. This he did, and the bell still hangs in the belfry of the old church.


PHOTOS

TBD


REFERENCES

Ivins official website
Ivins Historical Society
A history of Ivins
A history of Ivins
Wikipedia article about Ivins

"History of the Town of Ivins" by Myrtle L. Gubler

Washington County Chapter, Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, " Under Dixie Sun".
1950 with 1978 Supplement.
Pages 431-435, Supplement Pages 17-18.